28 Responses to Racism and Prejudice is a Human Rights Issue That Affects Us All

  1. Leanne Cole says:

    You have made some amazing points here Jackie. I couldn’t agree more with you. The problems in Australia are not so out in the open, and people here like to think they aren’t racist, but then you here them say things like, “look how badly that driver is driving, they must be Asian.” It really gets to me. Why do they have to make an assumption about what race the person is, why can’t they just be a bad driver.
    I do the same, I never make reference to someone’s race, unless it is important, but it so rarely is. I have brought my children up to treat everyone fairly, to not be concerned about race, and that race is no different to someone have blond hair or black hair, they look different, but we all look different. I hope they realise that it doesn’t matter what race some is, we are all human and that is the way they should be treated.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Jackie Saulmon Ramirez says:

      Thank you, Leanne. Most people are good people but because it is so rooted in the culture that non-minorities think they are not racist. My friend and co-member used to tell us that her Korean daughter was expected to be good at music and math while her black and black-Hispanic sons would do well in sports because of their race. My father used to talk about Irishmen being drunkards and black people were lazy but the ideas have not borne out over time. Sure, sometimes there are exceptions to the rule but to condemn an entire race because of one incident is wrong. The whole idea is to get people – whites mainly – to stop and take a good look at ourselves and honestly admit there are things we could do better… some thoughts that could improve.

      Like you, Leanne, I brought my girls to be open to all people regardless of race. We bought black, Asian and Peruvian dolls as well as white. I wanted their play to look like our neighborhood. Our neighbors are Italian, Puerto Rican, black and white; we were interested in a clean, quiet neighborhood whatever the people’s race was.

      You hit the nail on the head, Leanne, that we should observe the Golden Rule and treat everyone like we want to be treated in life. I don’t know much about Australia but here in the U.S. there are serious issues with far too many black citizens being killed for no reason except the color of their skin. The “fear” that white police officers feel comes from within, not from the black people they kill. Eric Garner was a father of six… and he died for nothing. Several police ganged up on him and one used an illegal chokehold to cut off his breathing… and there was no indictment. Nothing.

      I still have hope that these last incidents will get dialog going to help us fix these issues and begin to treat blacks and minorities equal to whites. If not we are missing a golden opportunity. Thank you, Leanne.

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      • Leanne Cole says:

        We have been watching in awe here, the racial issues you have there are so bad, and nothing like what it is here, here people know to keep their opinions to themselves, but every now and then it comes out. Here it is more the Asian community and them coming here, though before that is was some other group. Perhaps multi-culturalism doesn’t really work. We do have one of the most racist governments in the world, what our politicians do to refugees is criminal. I hate it.

        I think we all need to start realising that if took off our skin you wouldn’t be able to tell what race someone was. It shouldn’t matter. Why would you judge someone just because of the colour of their skin, or the shape of their eyes, or how wide their nose is. It is baffling.

        the thing I have found amazing is how others have justified the court ruling that cop in question was justified in what he did, and when I suggested that it would be interesting to find out the outcome if the jurors on the grand jury had no idea what race anyone was, I was simply told that the grand jury had made the right decision. I think it would be interesting if race didn’t come into it. It shouldn’t matter.

        If black people are acting a certain way, then perhaps you need to ask yourself, why? Why do that act that way, what has happened in the past to make them so. People never do, because they don’t want to think they are part of the problem. It is like climate change, I am sure people deny it is happening, because if they did admit to it, then they would have to change, and people don’t like change.

        One can hope it will start to make things different, but from what i have heard from people so far, it won’t. The white community seem to thing the cop was justified, and the black community think he wasn’t. That is the problem and the legal system is keeping these beliefs alive.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Jackie Saulmon Ramirez says:

        If a person is guilty, then let the justice system work. Too many blacks die before they even get to that.

        I see what you are saying but if a public trial had been held, many of the questions may have been answered and it would have been put to rest. When things are done in secret, all those questions remain. Our legal system is broken, it needs to be crystal clear for all parties. There is something wrong when every 28 hours, a black person dies.

        The thing that keeps turning in my mind is that if you change the race of the victim during the interaction, the incident will probably have a different outcome. Remember Trayvon who was killed by Zimmerman? If Trayvon were a white boy, I doubt very seriously that Zimmmerman would have pulled his gun. At most, Zimmerman might have told him to be careful on his way home. Eric Garner, if he were a white man, I doubt the officers would have treated him the same way. White privilege is something Neither Trayvon or Eric Garner could have. Until this racism/prejudice is corrected, the justice system needs to be fixed and police officers must be made accountable. Whites’ fear is not a good excuse. Another huge issue is that each community should be policed by the same percentage of race. Right now there are not enough police officers in most any area, and don’t tell me there are enough qualified blacks. There are several areas that must be looked at.

        At least people are talking….

        Liked by 1 person

      • Leanne Cole says:

        The biggest problem is we never learn, people are talking now, but soon they will be talking about holidays and such and it will become a distant memory, unfortunately. I don’t know what the answer is, it is going to need someone who is high up to say, “enough, we have to stop this”, so far no one is game to take it on. It will be like your gun laws, that is the sad part.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Jackie Saulmon Ramirez says:

        Guns is another issue almost uniquely ours alone in the U.S. There was a time we were considered to be a strong world power but not anymore, now we are held up and ridiculed. And you are right, it is sad, very sad.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Leanne Cole says:

        Your gun laws scare me, it is one reason why I am quite scared of coming to the US. I have never seen a pistol, except in the holster of policeman. We are brought to be very afraid of them. It is illegal here to have guns, any guns in your home, and if you do they have to be registered, and you have to justify why you have them. They have to be kept in a special safe, and the ammunition somewhere else entirely.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Jackie Saulmon Ramirez says:

        It’s not as bad here as in the south. I grew up in the south around guns. Many kids get their first gun as a rite of passage. It is a sickness that has been perpetuated by the NRA and the gun lobby. I personally hate guns. When my husband and I married he talked about getting a gun. I said to him, “What are you, crazy? With our bad tempers?” I told him there was no house big enough for me and a gun.

        I believe you will be safer in New York City than in the south. Crazy things happen all over though. Read up on safety measures before you come. Be wary of being alone and be careful about going out at night. Are you bringing someone with you? How about other photographers in New York?

        Liked by 1 person

      • Leanne Cole says:

        I think the only time I will be alone is on the plane, so that is good. I do feel like it will be good, and I’m not too scared on this trip, but I think it would be different if I was travelling around on my own.

        I’m with you, people with bad tempers, me included, should never be allowed to have a gun.

        Liked by 1 person

  2. Hi Jackie…this is an issue that is near to my heart for many reasons. My granddaughter is bi-racial. When she was born, my daughter and grandchild stayed with me and my (no longer-husband). My spouse used the N word in front of us, referring to her…my stomach turned. I am not from “The South”, and did not appreciate AT ALL, the use of the word! The town we live in sits right next to the birthplace of the “KKK”, and though so many residents do a great job loving and respecting differences, there are still traces of generations past. I instantly lose respect for people who do not respect differences. I am also a special education teacher in a public school. Yet another population that has historically been treated as “less than” human. I believe that I have ended up in this place, this profession, at this time, for a purpose that is bigger than I know. Thank you for shining a light on this issue!

    Liked by 1 person

    • Jackie Saulmon Ramirez says:

      Hello Louise, you are one of many. To me, the “N” word is like a hundred finger nails screeching on a chalkboard. The first time one of my children blurted out that word I felt like throwing up. That sweet child did not know what he was repeating but once they heard it they could not un-hear it. Respecting differences is the way to go; teaching kids that the words are disrespectful and hurtful and that it does not present the image you want to project – just like not swearing or using vulgar words. Any adult that would words to purposely hurt a child should be ashamed.

      Teaching is such a great career! Chelsey was in special ed classes the first two years of school… those teachers were amazing. Chelsey even went back during her college days to thank them for all the help they gave her. As a special ed teacher, you are in a wonderful position to positively influence many young lives for the better. It can sometimes take one person to make that difference that will create a ripple effect to make change happen. I’ve heard many times that we end up where we are for a reason. ❤ I so admire teachers that care and I thank you for stopping to comment on this important issue. 🙂

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      • I’m so glad your daughter experienced such support in her early years! I will run into former students around town, and get giant hugs. It means more than anything to see them happy! As for the other issue, I am part of a movement in my community…it will kick off with a music event to bring all youth together…integrating the church community, which is now incredibly segregated. I had never witnessed racism until I was 15, and I was appalled when, at my new school, I was told that the “white kids” went to a different place for dances (and I’m not THAT old)….that was in the early 80’s.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Jackie Saulmon Ramirez says:

        My daughter was very lucky. She went to a program called “Twixt” (Between 3 and 5) in New Brunswick, NJ and then later to Rutgers University down the street. 🙂 One of her favorite teachers lived near the campus which made it nice to visit. From what we know, the Twixt program was a pilot and as far as I know, they still have it there.

        I think you touched on a key, the socializing. I hear a lot of people say “Oh, I know some black people” or “I have black friends” but if you don’t rub elbows regularly then it could hardly be called a formal relationship. Getting kids together for events and activities will make a difference.

        😀 I am that old! Integration happened when I was in the 6th grade. I didn’t mind, I had three girls I walked home from school with until I got the daylights beat out of me by my father and I was told not to walk with “them N______s.” I hid out until they went on ahead and then I would walk alone. I was a kid, I had no choice. I learned there were good and bad in both races so you have to use the Golden Rule.

        Being a teacher, whether you know it or not, everything you teach kids may be forgotten but your kindnesses will remain. I remember every teacher I had and the good and bad things those teachers said or did. And that includes teachers from both races. Teachers are right up there with parents when it comes to your authority with a child’s self-esteem. That is powerful to think about. 🙂

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      • What an experience! My parents have stories of the beginnings of integration, when the white families all pulled their kids from school for an entire year! My parents returned to the integrated school after that year(1 person had integrated). Oddly, my return to college as an older adult, found me ending the chapter of integration as I had a partial scholarship under the final years of the mandated integration (busing). I attended an historically black university. I was the minority…when someone first suggested I go there under a “minority scholarship”, I had no idea! The education I received was top notch!

        Liked by 1 person

      • Jackie Saulmon Ramirez says:

        I hear you! My father took my older brother off the football team when the student body elected a black couple as the Homecoming queen and king that year. That must have been about the 3rd or 4th year into integration. It was pretty hot around there for a while. My father was so angry that one day when he was driving home and the black children walked in the road and did not move over for him to pass, he stomped the gas pedal and the kids scattered into both ditches. He was an adult… those kids were being silly but could have been hurt. Can you imagine?! 😮

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      • Oh my! It is such a time to shine light into all the darkness that fills our history…a great time for change…now that we know better, we must do better, as a society! You are doing just that!💖

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      • Jackie Saulmon Ramirez says:

        You are so right; we always try to better ourselves and teach our kids to do the same.

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  3. saymber says:

    Reblogged this on As I see it and commented:
    She said it all!!! I would like an article like this to be read by the entire world. It’s all here. Thank you!

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  4. saymber says:

    This article resonated with me so much and I thank you for posting it here. You got it all in here and I hope it’s read across the world. A key component to world peace is recognizing, appreciating and honoring how we are the same. When we do that, how we are different becomes icing on a fabulous cake!

    Liked by 1 person

    • Jackie Saulmon Ramirez says:

      Thank you for your lovely comment. I agree with you, that we are more alike than different and the sooner people realize that, the better we’ll all be. ❤

      Like

  5. I think it is wrong what has happen the last few years with white cops killing black people, not just people but kids, for no reason. The young black man selling I think cigarettes on the street corner, and he told them I can’t breath, the he died.

    The coroner said it was death by homicide, and the police got off free. That’s not right.

    If it is true or not, why does a policeman even call someone to his car window, then get out and shoot the person? It’s not right.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Jackie Saulmon Ramirez says:

      You are absolutely correct… it is not right that black people be targeted like this. It has gotten so bad that even white people are finally standing in unity with blacks. What is happening here in the U.S. is human rights violations. We have become a laughingstock for our hypocritical laws and abuses. This makes me very sad for black suffering and for our country.

      Liked by 1 person

  6. Gator Woman says:

    Thank you for this Jackie~

    Liked by 1 person

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